Katie Scott

“Sensory play is vital for child development as it encourages innovation, creativity, observation skills, and cognitive learning. Colour and shape help children define and organise the diverse world around them, whilst stimulating their imaginations.”

“In light of ongoing events, this is an extremely important time for children’s development who have been disrupted in both their education and social life. Encouraging sensory play, continuous learning and creativity is essential at home and in the classroom and this can be done with simple household materials and imagination.”

Katie Scott

Designer Maker

BA (Hons) Textile Design

Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design

Statement

“I have always been interested in the power of creativity and how art can effect people’s mental health and happiness. Crafting is proven to boost people’s mood, improve overall cognitive skills and help battle anxiety.

In a world increasingly reliant on technology, the younger generation are becoming more consumed by digital devices and social media than ever before. Traditional elements of childhood, such as playing outdoors, are being replaced by games consoles and tablets. Sensory play is vital for child development as it encourages innovation, creativity, observation skills, and cognitive learning. Colour and shape help children define and organise the diverse world around them, whilst stimulating their imaginations. Inspired by shapes and textured surfaces in the urban environment, my graduate collection Kidleidoscope aimed to capture a child’s curiosity to learn, play and explore.

Through non-toxic digital print techniques and material exploration, I have created a range of gender-neutral vibrant designs for children’s “play clothing”. Research concluded that bold colours are important to engage children as they can impact an individual’s mood, productivity, learning and behaviour. Practical and easy to wear garments, which are interchangeable, made from good quality cotton, denim and jersey ensure durability and comfort. Two moods within the collection; the Inventor and the Explorer, aspire to encourage children to dream big, play games, tell stories and be adventurous. I wanted to capture the innocence of childhood and how a simple shape or surface can spark endless fun and imagination. The energetic prints allow children to find their own stories within the designs and wear them how they want to by mixing and matching prints.

The aim is for children to have fun whilst wearing my designs, wear clothes which match their bright personalities and learn as they play. Inspired by Scandinavian brands, bold block colours and utilitarian silhouettes with practical features, were the underpinning of my designs. Sustainability is always an important consideration throughout my work- using recycled materials, organic cottons, non-toxic dyes, reusing odd buttons and scraps to create something new. I wanted to create textiles that can be manipulated by the consumer to ensure they never get bored of the product, make the garment versatile, last longer and reduce fashion waste.

In light of ongoing events, this is an extremely important time for children’s development who have been disrupted in both their education and social life. Encouraging sensory play, continuous learning and creativity is essential at home and in the classroom and this can be done with simple household materials and imagination.”

Materials and Techniques

“Cotton drill, jersey and soft denim were chosen for my graduate collection due to their durability but also comfort and versatility making them suitable for children’s clothing. Neoprene, cord and plastics were used to create interesting textures and add interactive accents to the collection.

Techniques involved developing original hand drawn sketches through Photoshop to create digital repeat patterns for print. These were printed directly on to cotton drill which works well with bright colours.
Laser cutting was used on denim and neoprene to create cut out shapes and trims to create unusual surfaces. Embroidery was then used to add beads, cord, elastic, buttons and poppers to make the garments enjoyable to wear. Embellishment processes such as laser cutting, embossing, foiling and flocking bring an element of “dress up” to the collection and create visually stimulating pieces of design.”


Awards, Exhibitions and News

“Based in Glasgow. I recently completed a masters degree at Glasgow Caledonian University in International Fashion Marketing, as I wanted to explore the business side of textiles, which I have thoroughly enjoyed and hope to set up my own business in the near future.

I have completed several internships, in both design and marketing work, with some local Glasgow brands which has been great experience and very insightful. I volunteered with a non profit clothing brand called The Blankfaces who help people experiencing homelessness and had the rewarding opportunity of holding some design workshops with them.

Currently working as a freelance design and marketer.”

Lockdown

“Over lockdown some days I found drawing the best way to relax and pass the time, however other days I found it very difficult to feel remotely creative. It gave me time to explore some new mediums and try out different things-I completed some digital skill courses and workshops online and entered several design competitions whilst growing a social media presence.” 


Insights

I really enjoy telling stories through my creative practice and aim to create textiles which make people happy and feel engaged. Lockdown has made everyone realise how important the arts are and it is more important than ever that we use our creativity, support local businesses and the arts community.